Paint your home to sell

First things first.  You all know how important it is to keep your home in showing condition when you have your home on the market to sell.  No clutter, messes, dirty laundry, etc.  But it’s also important to make your home look the best it can in order to move quicker and to get you a good return on investment.  Paint color is key.  

Let’s start with what not to do.  No wallpaper.  I know it’s hard to remove.  I know it matches the bath towels that you special ordered along with the custom faucets.  But it just doesn’t work for most people.  And the buyers that want move-in ready homes don’t want to deal with it, either.  So if you have wallpaper, you’re probably going to benefit the most from this blog post.  I suggest removing it and painting.

No white paint.  This might sound surprising given that it’s neutral.  But having all white walls can make your house look very sterile and not lived in.  It also can appear too bright.  You do want to keep the colors neutral.  So if you’re going to be painting, I suggest light beige or light yellow.  

Don’t go crazy.  I am completely serious when I say that I’ve shown homes where one room is orange, another turquoise, another dark purple, etc.  It looks hideous.  If you have this in your home now and you are planning on selling, you’ll want to paint all the walls neutral to match.  And remember that dark colors make a room look a lot smaller.  So for those of you with navy blue bathrooms, now is the time to go neutral.

Here’s what does work.  Make sure that there are no noticeable scratches or marks on walls.  Touching up paint is very simple to do and can make a huge difference.  It shows buyers that your home is well maintained and cared for.  According to this AOL blog, “Karen Dembsky, president of Peachtree Home Staging LLC and Georgia’s Real Estate Staging Association, as well as a Pro Stager of the Year nominee, has the first and most important piece of advice before even tackling the issue of color.

‘A seller should always make sure that their paint has a fresh appeal, no dings, no marks. If there are any, it should be repainted or touched up because it gives the feeling of a well-maintained home,” she said. “The color has to be livable and appealing, you want a color where the buyer will come in and say that it’s not their first choice but they can live with it.'”

Dembsky suggests food-related colors for the kitchen, such as yellow, red, or orange.  But this is not permission to go out and paint your kitchen bright orange.  You still want to keep it soft and light.  She doesn’t recommend bright colors for the bedrooms because people view bedrooms as a place to sleep and relax, so light and neutral is best.  Dembsky recommends beige and light tan for bathroom walls.  If you’re dying for a bit of color, play it up with colored hand towels, bath mats, and fun soaps.  She does say that you can go for darker and richer colors in a home office, especially to play against a dark wood desk.

I’d love to hear your thoughts on this.  Please leave me a comment or visit my Web site.

Remodeling mistakes to avoid

I opened up yesterday’s Chicago Tribune and found a great article on the cover of the Money & Real Estate section.  There were some great points that I wanted to share with you.  I’ve talked multiple times before about what’s important when remodeling and where you can get the most bang for your buck.  But this article talks about mistakes to avoid so that you don’t lose money and a potential buyer.  Here’s some mistakes not to make when choosing to remodel:

1. My favorite.  Really bad colors.  I’m not kidding when I tell you that I’ve seen a house like this.  I’ve actually seen several homes like this.  Walls painted bright orange, neon green.  I’ve seen homes with fake grass in the living room.  Avoid it.at.all.costs.  It’s not pretty.  If you’re going to paint, stay as neutral as possible.  If you’re selling your home and your house looks like this picture, paint the walls beige.  It’s only going to help you.

2. Dysfunctional floor plans.  So you want to convert your family room to a garage.  That won’t quite work if the family room is adjacent to the kitchen.  Think things through first.  It might make more sense to add a garage to the front of the home if that’s where the family room is.  But if not, choose another option.  Tandem rooms (where you have to enter one room to get to another) don’t work well.  You don’t want any room accessible only by entering another room first.  Every room should be accessible from a common hallway.

3. Too few baths to match bedrooms.  Some people need more space and decide to split a large bedroom into two smaller ones.  If you’re going to do this, make sure you have enough bathrooms to match.  Homes with 5 or 6 bedrooms and 1 shared bath are hard to sell.  And make sure bathrooms are accessible to bedrooms.  I’ve shown homes where the only bath was right near the front door and the three upstairs bedrooms were in the back of the house.  That’s a long walk in the middle of the night …

These tips should help you understand what buyers are looking for in their home.  And it’s worth talking to an experienced Realtor before any big home improvement project.  You can find out where to best spend your money.  I’m here to help!  Visit me online.

Remodeling not worth as much as it used to be

In a not-surprising news story in the Chicago Tribune, it turns out that those homeowners who choose to do some remodeling in their homes will not make as much money in resale value as they would have in previous years.  Most people are under the impression that if you do an upgrade or remodel to certain aspects of your home, you’ll get most or all of that money back when you sell.  Well, not so much in this market.  Unfortunately, more money is going in the contractor’s pocket than will go back in yours at the closing table.  

Remodeling Magazine has just put out their annual cost vs. value report for 2010-2011.  While you’re able to look at statistics and numbers for all areas of the country, I want to focus in on Chicago.  Let’s use a midrange major kitchen remodel for this year.  With the average job cost of $58,367, the homeowner would have a resale value of $40,126.  The percent of it being recouped is 68.7%, one of the highest values of all the remodeling projects.  However, last year that percentage was 72.1%.  So not a significant decrease, but still noticeable.

What’s interesting is that every single category the magazine studied, the percentage in recouped value was a decrease from last year.  Some examples of those categories include a basement remodel, bathroom addition, bathroom remodel, master suite addition, deck addition, siding replacement, window replacement, and others.  They also break it down into midrange projects and upscale ones.

Kermit Baker, director of the Remodeling Futures program at Harvard University‘s Joint Center for Housing Studies said, “A lot of what drove the (remodeling) market in 2003, 2006, 2007 was the notion that you were playing with house money.  You could get 90, 95 percent of your investment back. It was really a no-risk proposition. The mentality has clearly shifted to, ‘What kinds of features do I want in my home?’ given how long you live there and your lifestyle.”

So what does this mean for sellers in today’s market?  Just be smart about what projects you take on.  You might not have to spend the money on a complete kitchen remodel.  Sometimes just painting the cabinets and changing the hardware can make a world of difference.  You might not need to replace them all.   And if you have linoleum, it’s worth the upgrade to ceramic tile or hardwood.  Not every home needs granite countertops, especially those with small kitchens already.  It’s not worth the extra expense.  But do know that kitchens are the best room in the home to remodel.  While you might think you need to spend the money to finish your basement, that’s not necessarily true.  A young couple could come in and have a completely different idea of what they want it to look like.  See what the feedback is from the potential buyers coming through your home before you make any drastic improvements.  Talk to your Realtor about what he recommends before spending all that money.

For more information or to have me give you a market analysis on your home, please visit me online.